Tuesday, 16 April 2024
    $11,000 fines for one-use plastics
    06
    Sep
    Sustainability

    $11,000 fines for one-use plastics

    Residents of NSW could soon be hit with major fines of up to $11,000, for supplying or carrying single-use plastic items.

    The phase out, which will see everyday plastic items ditched from November 1, will stop around 2.7 billion pieces of litter entering the state’s waterways and environment over the next 20 years, according to the NSW government.

    The new list of vetoed items comes under the government’s Plastic Reduction and Circular Economy Act, passed in November last year, with the ban also applying to plastics considered biodegradable or compostable or bio.

    The list of banned items includes:

    • Single-use plastic straws

    • Stirrers

    • Cutlery

    • Plates

    • Bowls

    • Cotton buds

    • Expanded polystyrene food service items

    • Rinse-off personal care products containing plastic microbeads e.g. some face cleansers, shampoos or toothpaste.

    The ban will not apply to:

    • Serving utensils e.g. salad servers or tongs

    • Packing seals for food and beverage items.

    • Items included within or attached to that packaging, through a machine-automated process (such as a straw attached to a juice box or a spoon included with a yoghurt).

    Individuals supplying, selling or giving away any of the banned items will be slapped with a maximum court penalty of 100 units, equivalent to $11,000, while businesses supplying banned items could cop 500 units ($55,000).

    The penalties are doubled if a manufacturer, producer, wholesaler or distributor business is caught supplying plastics on the list. Groups can receive up to $110,000 in fines and individuals $22,000.

    Those who are found to supply banned items will be issued with a Stop Notice. Failure to adhere to the stop notice may result in a $55,000 individual or $275,000 business fine.

    FULL STORY

    Everyday items you could soon be fined $11,000 for (news.com.au)

    PHOTO

    kai Stachowiak / PublicDomainPictures